Kitchen Sink Drain

Kitchen drains are in some ways the most demanded upon drain in the home.  They are expected to accept a wide variety of substances including soaps, detergents, grease, food waste, fats and whatever else gets cleaned, drained, dumped or rinsed off.  Over time these things can build up on the walls of the drain pipe, essentially making the drain pipe smaller causing it to drain slower and slower.  As the inside diameter of the pipe becomes smaller it becomes more susceptible to intermittent blockages from larger pieces of waste attempting to pass through get stuck.

At One Hour Rooter we are often asked, “How do I unclog my kitchen sink?”  Well, there is no simple straight forward answer to that question.  It depends on where the clog is located in drain piping and your comfort level with tools and making plumbing repairs.  There are some simple things to try and some thing to be careful for.  First the warnings.

Drain chemicals are dangerous to humans and pets and some drain materials.  They are basically an acid intended to eat the clog.  In our opinion the risk vs reward is not worth using them.  Besides the health risks, they generally do not work well.  The drain cleaning chemical needs to be applied directly to the clog to have their greatest affect.  This is difficult to do if your kitchen sink does not drain.  Pouring chemicals on top of a sink full of standing water will do nothing.  If your sink does drain slowly, it might get enough chemical to the clog to have some affect, although the more water it mixes with the less strength it has.  If you are reading this because you have already tried the chemicals and they didn’t work and you now have a sink full of chemicals, that is ok.  “Relax we’ll take care of it!” Call One Hour Rooter.

You can try a plunger. If you have already used some drain cleaning chemicals, put on safety glasses and rubber gloves.  Those chemicals will burn.  Using a plunger to clean your kitchen sink drain may work if the clog is relatively close to the sink itself.  If the clog is located farther down your drain line, the plunger will have no affect.  Once the kitchen drain enters the wall from underneath the sink, it is connected to a vent that is open to the outside air.  In this case no matter how much effort you put into the plunger, the pressure you create will be released outside.  If the clog is within working distance of the plunger, here are a few tips.  If you have a kitchen sink with double bowls, plug one side while plunging the other.  They are connected underneath.  If you don’t plug the other side of the sink, the pressure you are creating on one side with the plunger, will blow water up the other side.  Also, make sure that the drain piping below the sink has good connections.  It is possible to separate the joints with pressure generated by the plunger.  Good Luck! If all else fails, don’t worry.  “Relax we’ll take care of it!” Call One Hour Rooter.